What’s Wrong With Captivity?

Do you think that roadside zoos and aquariums provide animals with proper care? Think again. Seedy zoos teach people that it’s somehow acceptable to interfere with animals’ natural lives and keep them locked up in restrictive enclosures and unnatural environments—where they’re frustrated, cramped, lonely, deprived of all control over their lives, and far from their homes. Jo-Anne McArthur’s new book, Captive, is teaching readers—and social media followers—about the reality of life in these facilities and challenging them to reconsider the captive animals staring out from their enclosures.

The book, which was released last month, is a compilation of photos taken over the last decade in more than 20 countries and across five continents. According to McArthur, who released We Animals in 2013, “Captive seeks to reveal the experiences of animals in zoos and aquaria around the world.”

Ingrid Newkirk, PETA founder and president, says the following about the book: “Captive” makes clear that, for their residents, roadside zoos are grim places, prisons that offer various degrees of loneliness, privation, and confinement. “Captive” captures the essence of these loveless enclosures, where animals grow old and mold just grows in the crevices of the walls and in their minds.

TO EAT, WEAR, EXPERIMENT ON, USE FOR ANIMALS ARE NOT OURS ENTERTAINMENT, OR ABUSE IN ANY OTHER WAY..

Reports PETA